The Way You Feel About Yourself Is The Way People Will Treat You

October 3, 2017

Do you think you're not smart enough? Not pretty or handsome enough?  Unworthy of happiness?  Even without you saying it, people can sense the way you feel about yourself. If you feel badly about yourself and communicate or operate from a weakened state, people will assume this is the way you want to be treated. Often times, how people treat you is not conscious or purposeful; they are simply feeding off of the energy that you are emitting.

 

Remember the Golden Rule, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”?  Try taking that mantra and personalizing it to ensure you get the treatment you deserve; Do unto YOU as you want others to do unto you.  How do you want people to treat you?  Be kind and forgiving to yourself.  We are often our worst critics. If you can’t respect yourself, no one will respect you, nor can you demand respect from others.

 

Silence those negative thoughts and turn the volume up on the positive ones.  You are perfect.  If you don’t believe it, fake it until you make it.  Write it down, repeat it, sing it, dance it.  Do whatever you have to do to beat that message in your head.  Once you believe it, everyone else will.  Live LOYT!

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Copyright © 2017 LOYT. All Rights Reserved.

The opinions expressed on this site are those of the authors and not any of the organizations mentioned on this site or in connection with LOYT. Stacey Stevenson and Cheralyn Stevenson do not claim to have legally recognized qualifications or authority to be therapists.  LOYT, Stacey and Cheralyn only offer advice as an act in a mentoring and guidance capacity.  The advice LOYT, Stacey and Cheralyn provide is meant for people in a normal mental and physical state of mind and not designed to treat or cure any illness.  LOYT, Stacey and Cheralyn’s advice is offered in good faith and should not be used as a substitute for the professional advice of medical doctors, psychiatrists or clinical psychologists.  LOYT, Stacey and Cheralyn do not accept any liability or responsibility for any loss or damage of any kind which may occur as a result of advice and guidance.  The use of advice or guidance provided by LOYT, Stacey and Cheralyn, and the interpretation of what is seen and heard, is your responsibility alone.  In all instances, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate professional treatment for any mental or physical illnesses.